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Incorporating Universal Design into Tsunami Modeling Results for Cascadia Subduction Zone Faults to Create an Inundation Map and Universally Designed Evacuation Map for Port Angeles, WA

Authors:

Hannah Rose Spero ,

Boise State University, US
About Hannah
Hannah Spero is a senior undergraduate student researcher pursuing her B.S. in Geosciences-Hydrology in the Department of Geosciences at Boise State University. She previously attended Central Washington University where she conducted undergraduate research focusing on tsunami inundation modeling in Puget Sound, Washington. She is interested in using depth-averaged modeling for tsunamis inundation scenarios and dam break flooding scenarios. Additionally, she works to integrate universal design into geohazard evacuation maps, as a part of the broader impacts of her research.
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Breanyn MacInnes,

Central Washington University, US
About Breanyn
Dr. MacInnes is a geologist at Central Washington University specializing in tsunami research. Dr. MacInnes’ research group focuses on combining tsunami modeling with tsunami field observations to interpret past earthquake rupture parameters, subduction-zone dynamics, and tsunami behavior. Dr. MacInnes also works on coastal geomorphology and stratigraphy, geoarchaeology, and neotectonic processes.
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Naomi Jeffery Petersen

Central Washington University, US
About Naomi
Dr. Naomi Jeffery Petersen is a professor in the Department of Curriculum, Supervision, and Educational Leadership. She research interests range from topics like systemic issues, including public health, watersheds, railroad and military histories, and accessibility. Dr. Naomi Jeffery Petersen is the creator and director of the Central Washington University Accessibility Studies Program. Her current research focuses on accessibility studies, and her teaching mirrors that research as she teaches courses on functional design for the environment, universal design, and inclusive teaching principles.
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Abstract

Current tsunami hazard inundation and evacuation maps in the Puget Sound are based primarily on Cascadia and Seattle fault tsunamis. The standard evaluation process for tsunami impacts focuses on elevation and hypothetical fault rupture of known and predicted earthquakes. However, there are several known tsunami deposits in the Puget Sound that are not from Cascadia or Seattle fault tsunamis, potentially from other faults within the region, that could affect tsunami mitigation. Work to understand newly discovered crustal deformation and faults in Puget Sound is ongoing, therefore evacuation and inundation maps need to be updated to include these new faults and integrate universal design more broadly. Methods involved using GeoClaw software to map tsunamis from the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ), Leech River fault (LRF), and Utsalady Point fault (UPF). Modeled tsunamis determined the overall inundation of Port Angeles, Washington through a wide range of earthquake inputs of magnitude, proximity, and recurrence. The output simulations were evaluated with key components of universal design to create a new tsunami hazard map. Comparison between the universal design-based map to current the tsunami hazard map allowed for an evaluation of the current evacuation map. This evaluation can improve the assessment of bridges and other evacuation mechanisms. This research can contribute to future tsunami hazard map revisions saving lives, can help with emergency management planning, and spur reevaluating evacuation plans within the tsunami impact area.
How to Cite: Spero, H.R., MacInnes, B. and Petersen, N.J., 2021. Incorporating Universal Design into Tsunami Modeling Results for Cascadia Subduction Zone Faults to Create an Inundation Map and Universally Designed Evacuation Map for Port Angeles, WA. International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities, 13(1), pp.1–8. DOI: http://doi.org/10.7710/2168-0620.0314
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Published on 17 May 2021.
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